A06 CHEN E4800: Protein Engineering

CHEN E4800: Protein Engineering

Registration Information
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Please note: This is a new course being offered for the first time on CVN in the Fall 2006 semester.

COURSE BENEFITS

Introduces fundamental tools and techniques currently used to engineer protein molecules. Covers the methods used to analyze the impact of these alterations on different protein functions with specific emphasis on enzymatic catalysis. Uses case studies to reinforce the concepts covered, as well as to demonstrate the wide impact of protein engineering research. Applies basic concepts in the chemical engineering curriculum (reaction kinetics, mathematical modeling, thermodynamics) to specific approaches utilized in protein engineering.

 

Course Significance: Protein engineering is a young and exciting interdisciplinary field where engineering principles and practices are utilized to generate molecules with novel properties. The applications of this technology can be found in diverse areas including: drug discovery, industrial chemical synthesis, transgenic plant research, and nanotechnology. Chemical engineers will continue to contribute significantly to this important discipline. As the worldwide impact of biotechnology increases, it is important to continually offer new and cutting edge instruction in these subject areas.

 

PROFESSOR BANTA

 

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering

Additional information about Professor Banta can be found here: http://www.columbia.edu/~sb2373/CV.pdf

 

APPLICABLE DEGREE PROGRAMS

 

Elective course for MS in Chemical Engineering

ADDITIONAL COURSE FEES


Lecturer/Manager:

Scott Banta

Office Hours:

Hours TBA

Office Phone:

820 Mudd (212) 854-7531

 

E-mail Address:

sbanta@cheme.columbia.edu


Day & Time of Class:

 

Viewing Schedule:

 

Class Location:

TBA

Class Homepage:

 

Credits for Course:

3

Class Type:

Lecture


Prerequisites:

CHEN E4230 Reactor Design and Control or equivalent.

May be taken concurrently, or by permission.

Description:

 

Required Text(s):

Witford, David Proteins, Structure and Function Wiley 2005

 

Text is not required, but it is strongly recommended. Manuscripts will be used for assigned readings. A general biochemistry book, such as Stryer, or Garrett and Grisham, will be a valuable resource throughout the semester.

 

Branden, Carl & John Tooze Introduction to Protein Structure, 2nd Ed Garland 1999

 

Also recommended, and many of the images used in the lectures are from this book

 

Molecular Modeling Kit:

 

You will be required to purchase the HGS Biochemistry Molecular Model 5000 Bio-Organic Set. These kits are available at the bookstore, and we will use them to build peptide and protein models.

 

Reference Text(s):

 

Homework(s):

 

Project(s):

 

Paper(s):

 

Midterm Exam(s):

 

Final Exam:

 

Grading:

Homework 10%

Midterm exam 25%

Final exam 40%

Individual Project 25%

 

        Homework will be due the following week in class. Late homework will have a 20% deduction.

        Midterm and final exams will be open book and open notes.

        An individual project will be assigned, and both oral and written reports will be due at the end of the semester. Additional information will be provided at a later in the semester.

        Courseworks system will be used for course maintenance and information dissemination.

 

 

Hardware Requirements:

 

Software Requirements:

Lecture Notes:

 

Lectures will be presented using Power Point. The lecture files will be placed on the Courseworks website at least 24 hours before the lecture.

 

Homework Submission:

Via fax or online upload to CVN


Approximate Weekly Schedule 

 

Week

Topic

Whitford Chapters

1

Introduction

1,2,6

2

Protein structure and folding

2,3,10,11

3

Proteins structure modeling

3

4

Protein expression and purification

9

5

Enzyme catalysis and kinetics

7

6

Methods of modification

9

7

Other modifications and de novo design

8

8

Metabolic engineering

 

9

(AIChE) Midterm and projects

 

10

(Election Day) Work on projects

 

11

Peptide engineering and nanotechnology

 

12

Other biocatalysis

 

13

Ethics, economics

 

14

Group project presentations

 

15

Final Exam

 

 


For more information, comments, or suggestions, please email us at cvn@columbia.edu.
Last Update: 28-Jun-06