A06 ELEN E6082: Topics in Systems Biology: Global Brain Modeling

ELEN E6082: Topics in Systems Biology: Global Brain Modeling

Registration Information
Online Course Preview

PLEASE NOTE: NEW COURSE BEING OFFERED ON CVN FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FALL 2006 SEMESTER

PLEASE NOTE: A VIDEO PREVIEW OF THIS COURSE HAS BEEN NEWLY ADDED AT THE FOLLOWING LINK: Online Course Preview

 

COURSE BENEFITS

The course will prepare the student to engage in global, computational modeling of the vertebrate brain. The course will first characterize the impediments to global brain modeling and present a perspective that will serve as a framework for the course and a guide to future research. Various classes of neural networks and their properties will be reviewed to serve as a foundation for interpreting computational models of various brain structures. A broad survey of vertebrate functional neuroanatomy and a characterization of the brain's inputs and outputs with respect to the body’s internal milieu (homeostatic sensors and the endocrine system) and the external environments (sensory and motor systems) follow. Upon this computational and biological grounding, the course will analyze various brain structures in depth and explore representative computational models. The course will then explore the integration of these components into global brain models, beginning with an analysis of the problems vertebrate brains must solve. Various approaches and models for integration will then be presented. The course will conclude with a discussion of open issues and approaches forward. Throughout the course, the relationship of the content presented to the task of global brain modeling will be highlighted and analyzed. Demonstrations and homework assignment will provide students practical experience with models and simulations.

 

PROFESSORS PECK III and KOZLOSKI

 

James Kozloski, IBM Research Staff Member, Yorktown Heights, NY

Charles Peck, IBM Research Staff Member, Yorktown Heights, NY

 

Adjunct Professors of Electrical Engineering

 

 

 

APPLICABLE DEGREE PROGRAMS

ADDITIONAL COURSE FEES


Lecturer/Manager:

Charles Peck III

Office Hours:

TBA

Office Phone:

Please send email for appointment

E-mail Address:

cpeck@us.ibm.com


Day & Time of Class:

Thursday, 4:10-6:40 PM

Viewing Schedule:

One 2.5 hour lecture per week

Class Location:

TBA

Class Homepage:

TBA

Credits for Course:

3

Class Type:

Lecture


Prerequisites:

  • Familiarity with various classes of neural network models and their properties.
  • Knowledge of Matlab.

 

Description:

The course will prepare the student to engage in global, computational modeling of the vertebrate brain. The course will first characterize the impediments to global brain modeling and present a perspective that will serve as a framework for the course and a guide to future research. Various classes of neural networks and their properties will be reviewed to serve as a foundation for interpreting computational models of various brain structures. A broad survey of vertebrate functional neuroanatomy and a characterization of the brain's inputs and outputs with respect to the body’s internal milieu (homeostatic sensors and the endocrine system) and the external environments (sensory and motor systems) follow. Upon this computational and biological grounding, the course will analyze various brain structures in depth and explore representative computational models. The course will then explore the integration of these components into global brain models, beginning with an analysis of the problems vertebrate brains must solve. Various approaches and models for integration will then be presented. The course will conclude with a discussion of open issues and approaches forward. Throughout the course, the relationship of the content presented to the task of global brain modeling will be highlighted and analyzed. Demonstrations and homework assignment will provide students practical experience with models and simulations.

 

Required Text(s):

A.K. Afifi, R.A. Bergman, “Functional Neuroanatomy: Text and Atlas,” McGraw-Hill Professional, 1997, ISBN: 0070015899

Reference Text(s):

 

Homework(s):

 

Project(s):

 

Paper(s):

 

Midterm Exam(s):

 

Final Exam:

 

Grading:

1) Participation (15%): In class participation and online discussion postings

2) Homework assignments (25%): Homework will introduce students to the models and simulations covered in lectures using exercises that replicate published models.

3) Project (30%): Students will be asked to extend published models and conduct simulation-based experiments as a part of a project.

4) Final exam (30%): Students will be asked to analyze and critique a published integrated brain model.

 

Hardware Requirements:

 

Software Requirements:

 

Homework Submission:

If applicable, via fax or express mail to CVN

 

                        Course lectures

 

Lecture 1: Introduction to Global Brain Modeling and its Requirements

Lecture 2: Review of Neural Models and Neural Networks

Lecture 3: Survey of Vertebrate Functional Neuroanatomy

Lecture 4: Brain Inputs/Outputs: The Body

Lecture 5: Brain Inputs/Outputs: The Environment

Lecture 6: Component Models: Spinal Cord and Brainstem

Lecture 7: Component Models: Neocortex and Thalamus

Lecture 8: Component Models: Basal Ganglia

Lecture 9: Component Models: Cerebellum

Lecture 10: Component Models: Hippocampus

Lecture 11: Component Models: Limbic System

Lecture 12: Integrated Models: Requirements Analysis

Lecture 13: Integrated Models: Compare and Critique

Lecture 14: Road Ahead: Open Issues and Approaches Forward

 

 

 


For more information, comments, or suggestions, please email us at cvn@columbia.edu.
Last Update: 1-Aug-06